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Thread: How To Remove Scratches & Hazing From Your Windscreen

  1. #1
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    Default How To Remove Scratches & Hazing From Your Windscreen

    Here ya go!

    The following is how I was taught how to work out scratches, and surface hazing from plastic windscreens. I've been in the boatbiz for over 30 years but this here trick I learned from a gent back in 75' who worked on commercial aircraft as the windows in jets are plastic. It has served me well over the years.
    The photos are of me performing the process to a self inflicted 180 grit profile series of scratches that I put in my windsreen with a piece of 180 grit sandpaper.
    180 grit sandpaper that scratched my windscreen. I picked 180 as this would be at least the same as wear and tear (if not deeper) on an old windscreen.


    Scratching the plastic



    View of the multi-scratched substrate. You can even see the scratched out strands of plastic there on the left.



    What you are looking at here, is the affected spot where I wet sanded it with
    400 grit wet-n-dry sandpaper to a uniform haze.
    This is where you have to judge what grit paper to use. In my opinion, never start at anything more aggresive than 400 grit and always finish with either 1500 or even 2000 grit.




    After the 400 grit wet sanding, I then repeated the process with 1500 grit wet sanding.



    Then, on to the buffing. I start out with a machine buffer electric or air on low speed with a foam polishing pad and buff the surface with 3M™ Perfect-It™ Rubbing Compound (PN 06085/06086)

    Buff again with a finer compound like 3M Perfect-It III #05933. Then clean and check again for clarity.
    And, I like to do a final overall polish with a car polish like NU-Finish using a lambs wool buffing bonnet on low speed.




    And, there ya go! Scratches gone!





    Below, can be used as a general guide.

    1. Wash well with soapy water.

    2. Take a bucket of water and put in a few drops of dish soap.

    3. Take a piece of 400 or 600 grit wet and dry sandpaper and wet-sand the affected surface to a uniform haze of scratches.

    4. Then wet-sand with 1500 grit. Now, take a machine buffer on low speed with a foam polishing pad and buff the surface with 3M™ Perfect-It™ Rubbing Compound (PN 06085/06086) until you attain a fairly good clarity.

    5. Wipe clean with water, dry, and check clarity. If the clarity is not clear as plate glass, then proceed to #6.

    6. Buff again with a finer compound like 3M Perfect-It III #05933. Then clean and check again for clarity.

    7. Still not clear enough? Still see some scratches? do the process again but start with 1000 grt and work back up.


    NOTE You paid nothing for the description of this process and you use it at your own risk!

  2. #2
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    Thanks Captain...good, useful stuff!
    Dangerous Dave


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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarthRider View Post
    Thanks Captain...good, useful stuff!
    My pleasure, DR

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    Quote Originally Posted by DarthRider View Post
    Thanks Captain...good, useful stuff!
    Reckin he's any kin to John "The Martinizer"?

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    Capt, thats great, thanks.
    Dean O
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Capt. Nemo View Post
    NOTE You paid nothing for the description of this process and you use it at your own risk!

    Nice write-up Captian! One thing I would like to add is that some windshield manufactures are adding a clear coat/protectant to the top coat of the windshield and if you sand thru (speaking from experience) it will not be pretty and the whole windshield will need to be sanded down.

    Scott

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    Quote Originally Posted by isiahstites View Post
    Nice write-up Captian! One thing I would like to add is that some windshield manufactures are adding a clear coat/protectant to the top coat of the windshield and if you sand thru (speaking from experience) it will not be pretty and the whole windshield will need to be sanded down.

    Scott
    My R1150R Sport Touring shield is made like that...
    Dangerous Dave


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    Bring an open mind..."

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by isiahstites View Post
    Nice write-up Captian! One thing I would like to add is that some windshield manufactures are adding a clear coat/protectant to the top coat of the windshield and if you sand thru (speaking from experience) it will not be pretty and the whole windshield will need to be sanded down.

    Scott
    Wow, good to know that one!
    I guess then as you noted, a person would have to do an overall sand in say, 2000 grit and then do a full buff out.
    If I can get my hands on a wrecked-modern-coated screen I'll do some experimenting with it.

    Short story on how I was exposed to this trick.
    Back in the mid 70's I had just started renting my own little boat repair shop on the shores of Benicia, Calif. I had in my shop an old eary 60's fiberglass ski boat called an "ArenaCraft" built by the late Dan Arena.
    Up until that time my main boat work was wood. But, it was very clear to me that in order to keep a boat repair business busy I was going to have to learn to do it all. Spray painting using aircraft grade two-part urethanes was really startng to take off as a means to restoring the finish to gel coated fiberglass boats, and this ski boat was a good candidate. I accomplished a very nice "wet look" spray job on the boat, and this just made the hazed and scratched windshield look even worse!
    One of my other ittle repair jobs I had going at the time was to re-deck a wooden sailboat. That owner worked at United Airline Re-Hab in South S.F. where he worked on repairing commercial aircraft. He's the one that taught me how to restore plastic windscreens as he did this sort of work to all of the plastic glass in commercial aircraft.
    Last edited by Capt. Nemo; 03-12-2009 at 10:26 AM.

  9. #9
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    I believe Roger (Jammin') has restored aircraft (and bike) plasticc the same way. At least my (more every day) hazy memory indicates Roger described that method to me when I was in AZ last year.

    Ah, tech help in multiple geographic areas.

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by JCsman View Post
    I believe Roger (Jammin') has restored aircraft (and bike) plasticc the same way. At least my (more every day) hazy memory indicates Roger described that method to me when I was in AZ last year.

    Ah, tech help in multiple geographic areas.

    Life is good!

    The Cafe is good!

    Life with the Cafe is great!
    I've used a micro mesh kit for years for aircraft. Capt, welcome. I've seen you floating around ADV. I'm AZRamjet over there.

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